Animal Facts

  • Pademelon

Pademelon

The pademelon (Thylogale billardierii) is a stocky animal with a relatively short tail and legs to aid its movement through dense vegetation. It ranges in colour from dark-brown to grey-brown above and has a red-brown belly. Males, which are considerably larger than females, have a muscular chest and forearms, and reach up to 12 kg in weight and 1 - 1.2 m in overall length, including the tail. Females average 3.9 kg in weight.

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  • Bennetts Wallaby

Bennetts Wallaby

The Bennetts wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), known as the red-necked wallaby on mainland Australia, is one of the states's most commonly seen native animals. Visitors to most of our national parks are highly likely to encounter these animals during their stay.

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  • BrushTail Possum

BrushTail Possum

The Common Brushtail Possum is the best known of all our possums because it has adapted to living in our cities and suburbs. As the suburbs overtake natural areas, animals are forced to live in close quarters with people.

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  • Eastern Grey  Kangaroo or Forester in Tasmania
  • Eastern Grey  Kangaroo or Forester in Tasmania
  • Eastern Grey  Kangaroo or Forester in Tasmania

Eastern Grey Kangaroo or Forester in Tasmania

The Forester kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) is the largest marsupial in Tasmania and the second largest in the world - males can reach over 60 kg and, when literally on tippy toes, stand 2 m tall!

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  • Common Wombat
  • Common Wombat
  • Common Wombat

Common Wombat

The common wombat is the largest burrowing herbivorous mammal. Indeed, it is such an accomplished burrower that early settlers called it a 'badger', a term that is still heard today. However, the closest relative of the wombat is, in fact, the koala.

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  • Echidnas

Echidnas

Echidnas (Tachyglossus aculeatus), or spiny ant eaters as they are sometimes known, are familiar to most Australians. Echidnas are monotremes (mammals that lay eggs). There are only three species of monotreme in the world -- the platypus and two species of echidna, one of which is restricted to the New Guinea highlands. They have many features which are reptilian in nature such as egg laying, legs that extend outward then downward, and a lower body temperature (about 31-320C), than other mammals.

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  • Eastern Barred Bandicoot

Eastern Barred Bandicoot

The endearing eastern barred bandicoot (Perameles gunni) is a small (640 grams) marsupial characterised by a slender, elongated head tapering to a pink nose and well whiskered muzzle. It has large, prominent ears. Its soft fur is greyish brown, while across the hindquarters are the characteristic pale bars or stripes that give the species its name. These easily distinguish it from the brown bandicoot, which lacks such strips. The belly, feet and short, thin tail are creamy white.

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  • Fiordland Crested Penguin
  • Fiordland Crested Penguin
  • Fiordland Crested Penguin
  • Fiordland Crested Penguin

Fiordland Crested Penguin

The most timid of the crested penguins, the Fiordland crested penguin stands about 40cm and weighs around 4 kilograms. The head, throat and upperparts are black and underparts are white.

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  • Little Blue Penguin
  • Little Blue Penguin
  • Little Blue Penguin

Little Blue Penguin

The Little Blue Penguin is one quite small compared to other species. In fact, it is due to this small size that it is also referred to as the Fairy Penguin. It is the smallest of all the penguins in the world. It can weigh up to 3 pounds and it would be taller than 13 inches. They have a deep blue coloring to them which is why they have been named the Little Blue Penguin. This blue color is on top of their head and all down their back side. The front is white.

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